Does the Thyroid Gland Play a Role in Depression, Anxiety and Psychosis? – Is the TSH enough to diagnose thyroid dysfunction?

Ever wondered if your thyroid gland is playing a role in your depression, anxiety or psychosis? A month ago, I saw a 24 year old male who was admitted for increasing feelings of low mood and thoughts of suicide. On assessment, he showed symptoms of severe depression with no psychosis. Further investigations revealed a TSH of 5.5 and a normal T4 and T3. An endocrine referral was made and the endocrinologist told me this is “mild subclinical hypothyroidism”. Whilst this is true from the endocrinologist’s perspective, does it hold true from the psychiatrist’s perspective? And….what about the patient?

Read the full article on Psychscenehub.

This article is written by Dr Sanil Rege. Sanil is a Consultant Psychiatrist in Mornington, Victoria and co-founder of psychscene.com. He is pursuing an MBA at the Melbourne Business School.  You can follow him on Google+


2 Responses to "Does the Thyroid Gland Play a Role in Depression, Anxiety and Psychosis? – Is the TSH enough to diagnose thyroid dysfunction?"

  1. Lynn says:

    As someone who has suffered from depression and Hashimoto’s hypothyroid without proper treatment for many years, I appreciate your article and am happy to see that some doctors out there are finally acknowledging a connection. I am a moderator in an autoimmune thyroid group and many are familiar with the benefits of the right amount of meds on improving psychological states. I never thought I’d get past the depression, but I consider myself free from it now and it was due to learning how to address my thyroid issue along with some autoimmune triggers. Thank you for posting this article.

  2. Hi Lynn,
    Thank you for your comment. Autoimmune thyroid and Autoimmune conditions in general are becoming increasingly important in psychiatry. Links between Vit D, Autoimmunity , Thyroid etc are all links that are slowly coming to light, putting greater onus on the doctor to take a holistic view of the patient and looking at all aspects of “disease”genesis. Simply putting a name to the condition, may not be enough; getting to the core issue is crucial to achieve remission. I will be posting more about these issues in due time.

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